I seem to be bang up to date with the story of Macavity’s restoration now, and as such much of the work completed during 2015 will have been covered in detail in my posts. Just to recap though, I spent the end of 2014 and the beginning of 2015 working on the green project dinghy whenever there was a dry spell. This meant that Spring 2015 rather caught me out with regards to getting Macavity ready for launch. I had a frantic period of (thankfully hot, sunny) weekends and evenings doing whatever I could from my wish list. It turned out rather well considering.

Firstly, I had a plan to move the battery/batteries to a new location under the quarter berths. This, I reasoned, would put that considerable mass of lead right over the keels where it belonged. Ply shelves were made up, bolted in place, and complimented by the necessary retaining straps and connection cables.

Quarter berth painted and given over to new battery storage duties. (See new ply shelf in bottom.)

Quarter berth lockers painted and given over to new battery storage duties. (See new ply shelf in bottom.)

Battery in it's box and strapped down in position. Same thing in the opposite locker.

Battery in it’s box and strapped down in position. Same thing in the opposite locker.

The old companionway locker was then given a spruce up and promoted to housing nicer things. Like cake and candles.

Much more like sense this, think I'm going to fill this locker with emergency cherry bakewells.

Much more like sense this, think I’m going to fill this locker with emergency cherry bakewells.

All the other cabin lockers were also cleaned up and given a lick of grey bilge paint. The cabin top and sides were in a right shabby old state, so they were next to go under the sander.

Shabby, crusty, naaaasty.

Shabby, crusty, nasty.

 

 

 

Again, plenty of good sanding discs needed to remove stuborn, gritty deck paint.

Again, plenty of good sanding discs needed to remove stubborn, grippy deck paint. Note to self; old non slip deck paint is absolutely the hardest thing to remove, being incredibly gritty it’s like trying to sand sandpaper. Never ever paint anything with the stuff unless you are sure its necessary.

Any time spent in careful scraping, degreasing and masking will pay off later on with good clean lines and no splatter marks to ruin the look, and good masking tape (like the 3m blue stuff) makes the job quick and easy due to its non tear, stretchy qualities. You’ve got to buy masking tape and paint, so you might as well buy good stuff that’s going to make your life easier and the job better. It’s the prep that’s the hard bit not the painting.

After many, many hours of tedious sanding.

After many, many hours of tedious sanding…..

...masking

…masking…

DSCN0362

…and painting, she looked much more presentable. Mostly.

 

I repainted the boot top before putting on the new antifouling. I was so impressed with the Interspeed ultra that I used last year on the waterline in an attempt to curb the weeds, that I used it on the whole underwater surface. Red this year again. We shall see if it was money well spent as the season goes on. I used about two thirds the normal amount, so in reality the price difference wasn’t that much. £20 maybe? Should keep her sleek and clean until October with no extra scrubbing I’m hoping.

The good stuff. You will thank yourself for shelling out the extra pennies.

The good stuff. You will thank yourself for shelling out the extra pennies on this sort of thing.

Exterior work finished (for 2015 at least).

Exterior work finished (for 2015 at least).

My arms were aching with all that sanding and painting so I called it a day for this year and gave the topsides a quick coat of protective wax and turned my attention to a few bits of extra “hardware”. These amounted to a flip out home made GPS holder (varnished ply offcut on brass hinges), extra cam cleats and fairleads either side of the main hatch for boom preventer/extra headsail duties, some old chromed eyes along the outsides of the cockpit combings to allow easier rigging of the boom tent, a few strategic pieces of black bungee to stop stuff from flying about in the cabin, an extra shelf behind the sink, and some pencil holders.

Captive pencil.

Captive pencil. Simple offcut of hard wood with holes drilled in it.

Swing out mount for my handheld GPS.

Swing out mount for my handheld GPS.

By now it was nearing May. Time for a good clear up and wipe down inside, then book the crane at Retreat for the first available spring high.  Dammit! Will miss the first bank holiday again this year. Still, she should be ready for action soon after and nicer to sail at that.